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While a Steve Jobs strategy agenda memo revealed an iPhone nano in 2010, patents covering such a device date back to 2007

Apple updates their AssistiveTouch Patent while filing 6 new Patent Applications covering UIs for Workout Content+

1 cover AssistiveTouch

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On May 19 Patently Apple posted a report titled "Apple Previews a Powerful new Apple Watch feature called AssistiveTouch that uses patented wrist-gesture technology & more." Then on June first we posted a granted patent report regarding AssistiveTouch.

 

Today, the U.S. Patent Office published an update to this important invention titled "Motion and gesture input from a wearable device."

 

In Apple's patent FIG. 1B below we see photodiodes of an Apple Watch which collects sensor data that is captured by expansion and contraction in the tissue of the user's wrist during a hand gesture; FIG. 5A illustrates a user interface prompting a user to perform a hand flap gesture. Such a user interface may be displayed during a first period and sensor data may be collected during the first period while the user interface is displayed. FIG. 5B illustrates a user interface prompting a user to perform a hand clench gesture.

 

2 AssistiveTouch patent figures  Apple

 

Apple's patent FIG. 6 above illustrates an exemplary method of training for gesture detection.

 

In today's patent update, Apple has scrapped their previous 20 patent claims and replaced them with 20 all-new patent claims to better protect this invention. The first 15 new claims cover "The Method" while the remaining 5 patent claims covers "The Wearable electronic device." Below are a few of the new claims:

 

New Patent Claim 1 (#21): "A method for training gesture detection, the method comprising: displaying a user interface on a display of a wearable device; prompting a user of the wearable device, via the user interface, to perform a first type of gesture; after prompting the user to perform the first type of gesture and during a first time period, collecting first sensor data from a set of photodiodes of the wearable device; prompting the user, via the user interface, to perform a second type of gesture; after prompting the user to perform the second type of gesture and during a second time period after the first time period, collecting second sensor data from the set of photodiodes; extracting first characteristics from the first sensor data; assigning at least some of the first characteristics to a first cluster of signal characteristics; extracting second characteristics from the second sensor data; assigning at least some of the second characteristics to a second cluster of signal characteristics; detecting the first type of gesture when subsequently collected sensor data corresponds to the first cluster of signal characteristics; and detecting the second type of gesture when the subsequently collected sensor data corresponds to the second cluster of signal characteristics."  

 

New Patent Claim 9 (#29): A method for training gesture detection, the method comprising: displaying a training interface on a display of a wearable device; displaying, via the training interface, a representation of a gesture; collecting sensor data from a set of photodiodes of the wearable device within a defined time period following displaying the representation of the gesture; determining characteristics of the sensor data; assigning at least some of the characteristics to a cluster of characteristics; and assigning the cluster of characteristics to the gesture.

 

New Patent Claim #16 (#36): "A wearable electronic device comprising: a housing; a set of photodiodes disposed within the housing; a display within the housing; and a processor configured to: cause display of a training interface on the display; cause the training interface to display a representation of a gesture; collect sensor data from the set of photodiodes of the wearable device within a defined time period following display of the representation of the gesture; determine characteristics of the sensor data; and assign at least some of the characteristics to a cluster of characteristics."

 

To review the remaining 17 new patent claims, review Apple's continuation patent 20210255705 here.

 

If you're wondering why Apple didn't just renumber their new claims 1-20, here's the logic according to the U.S. Patent Office. Apple has to "continue" the number sequence of their patent claims in order to keep the original patent filing date in place which is crucial in protecting any patent. That's why it's called a continuation patent. If Apple chose to number their patent claims 1-20, they'd have to file a whole new patent application and lose their granted patent status.

 

Today is another slow summer patent day, but there were a few other patents some may find interesting as linked to below.

 

Six Apple patent applications were published today at the U.S. Patent Office covering "User Interfaces for Workout Content" as follows:

 

20210255826

20210252337

202102557473

20210255758

20210252369

20210252341

 

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3 patent figs regarding UI's for Workout Content

 

In addition, an iMac patent application covering a fan assembly was published today, though with the new iMac design having gone with a two smaller fan assembly, today's patent would appear to now be obsolete. Lastly, you could check out a patent application from Apple titled "Sensor Assembly for Electronic Device" relating to sensors in an iPad.

 

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