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Apple Wins a Patent for Filtering Unintended Contacts on an Apple Watch with Wet Clothing that Drains Battery Life

1 cover wet sleeve detection  compensation

 

The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office officially published a series of xx newly granted patents for Apple Inc. today. In this particular report we cover to touch input processing for touch-sensitive devices, and more particularly, to filtering unintended contact detected on a touch sensor panel or touch screen from a wet fabric that could drain battery life.

 

Apple's granted patent relates to touch input processing for touch-sensitive devices, and more particularly, to filtering unintended contact detected on a touch-sensitive surface. In wet environments in particular, water (e.g., from rain, shower, sweat, etc.) on the touch-sensitive surface can be erroneously detected as touch input and degrade touch performance.

 

Additionally, moist or wet fabrics (e.g., a shirt or coat sleeve) on the edge of a touch-sensitive surface (e.g., of a wearable device worn on the wrist) can be erroneously be detected as touch input and degrade touch performance.

 

In some examples, input paths can be classified as touch paths (likely intended input) or non-touch paths (likely unintended input corresponding to a wet fabric). Non-touch paths can be filtered out to avoid unintended input to touch-sensitive devices.

 

Classifying paths as non-touch paths in this manner can reduce processing requirements and save power by rejecting such non-touch paths corresponding to wet fabrics without requiring further processing-intensive algorithms to reject these non-touch paths.

 

Additionally, classifying paths can improve touch performance in environments where a wet fabric (e.g., a sleeve) may come in contact with the edge of the touch-sensitive surface. In some examples, paths can be classified as touch paths or non-touch paths based on characteristics of edge touch nodes. In some examples, paths can be classified as touch paths or non-touch paths based on a determined state.

 

Apple's patent FIG. 4 below illustrates an exemplary plot of touch signal thresholds corresponding to different objects proximate to or touching a touch-sensitive surface; FIGS. 5A-5B illustrate an exemplary representation of an input patch corresponding to a wet material contacting an edge of a touch-sensitive surface.

 

2 apple watch - wet sleeve correction

 

Apple's patent FIG. 12 above illustrates an exemplary process for classifying a path based on the tracked state.

 

Apple's granted patent 10,831,296 was filed in Q1 2019. The associated provisional patent was filed in Q3 2018. You could further review the full patent here.  

 

10.52FX - Granted Patent Bar

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