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Eddy Cue Plays the Government Fear Card talking about the possible Abuse of an iPhone Search against Latino Immigrants

10. 0 PA NEWS -

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Thus far everything the government has requested of Apple has been focused on unlocking iPhones owned by a terrorist and criminals. The FBI has to go before a judge with a court order justifying cause. Apple has been fighting the government starting with the San Bernardino iPhone. To win over the public, Eddy Cue went on the offensive yesterday and talked up the fear card with scenarios that are not a part of the current issue. It's the "what if" game. According to yesterday's interview with Spanish Univision, Eddy Cue said that if the FBI wins in its case against Apple to help it unlock the San Bernardino killer's iPhone 5C, it won't be long before the government forces Apple to turn on users' iPhone cameras and microphones to spy on them. Yet what was more disturbing is that Cue, a Cuban American, played up the fear card for immigrants who are already on edge over comments made by Presidential candidate Donald Trump that he intends to rightfully deport illegal immigrants that are mainly coming over the Mexican border. That was crossing a line and yet Cue played that up. The report noted that "In addition, [Eddy Cue] warns that the case would set a worrying precedent for immigration investigations where the authorities could also ask for unlocking phones."

 

The following is a rough translation of specific segments of the Univision article and interview with Apple's senior vice president of Internet Software and Services, Eddy Cue in regards to Latinos:

 

"Cue, born in Miami, said that now only speak Spanish to Cuban parents (and will note the vocabulary mixed with English). He argues that the Government's position will create a precedent that may threaten the freedoms that his parents came to look to the United States.

 

"Someday want to (Apple) turn you (a user) to the camera phone, microphone - says-." These are things that we can't do now. But, if they can force us to do that, I think that is very bad".

 

Q: Latinos, many of them immigrants, are one of the populations most vulnerable. Should they be especially worried?

 

A: Any law that gives so much authority and ability (to the Government) get to the information of a person, it is one thing to worry much and have to look very well. Because, as I told you, would where it goes up in a case of divorce, in a case of immigrants, in a case tax? Someday, someone will turn on the phone, microphone... That must not happen in this country.

 

Q: A technology so could be used in investigations of immigration?

 

A: Why not? (...) What happens in this country is that, when you go to a court and a judge gives a decision, then other judges have the opportunity to make the same decision.

 

So in a case of immigrant, can become a judge and the judge says that the same law that applied in this case applies here. So sure that will happen.

 

You could read the full translation of the Univision interview here where Eddy Cue talks about Apple Pay security and their current case fighting the court order compelling them to assist the FBI in unlocking the iPhone 5c of the San Bernardino Terrorist Syed Farook.

 

On Monday Patently Apple posted a report titled "A Cabal of Billionaires, Politicians and Tech CEOs like Tim Cook Attend Secret Meeting about Taking down Trump." So Eddy Cue playing the fear card with Latino's shortly after this secret meeting took place was definitely a conscious move playing right into the anti-Trump rhetoric without ever even mentioning him by name. But one thing is for sure, the Latino community knew exactly what was meant by his commentary and that's the point.

 

10. 1 PA - Bar - NewsAbout Making Comments on our Site: Patently Apple reserves the right to post, dismiss or edit any comments. Comments are reviewed daily from 4am to 6pm PST and sporadically over the weekend.

 

 

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